About

History of The United Methodist Youth Fellowship in the Philippines

  • The Methodist Youth Fellowship was formally installed at the Watch Night Service, December 31, 1941. It represents the merger of youth groups from
  1. The Methodist Protestant Church
  2. Methodist Episcopal Church, South
  3. The Methodist Episcopal Church

These three (3) churches were joined at the Uniting Conference of 1939 at Kansas City, Missouri.

  • On May 15, 1889, the Epworth League (EL) of The Methodist Episcopal Church was founded at Central Methodist Episcopal Church (now Epworth-Euclid Methodist Church) in Cleveland, Ohio. The Epworth League in turn was a merger of five (5) pioneering youth organizations that had begun their work as early as 1877.
  • In 1889 a group of young people’s societies in The Methodist Episcopal Church, South, was organized into a co-operative union. Believing in the importance of youth work, the General Conference of The Methodist Episcopal Church, South, meeting in Saint Louis, Missouri, in 1890, responded to a memorial (resolution) that had been sent by the Trinity Methodist Episcopal Church, South, of Los Angeles, California. This action of the General Conference authorized the formation of the Epworth League of The Methodist Episcopal Church, South. The official youth program of The Methodist Protestant Church was Christian Endeavor, founded in 1881 at Portland, Maine. It serves as a non-denominational youth program for many denominations. At the time of the unification of the three (3) Methodist Churches the General Conference of the Methodist Church gave the General Board of Education the responsibility for bringing together the youth work of the Church into a unified program for all the youth of the Methodist Church. To accomplished this, the Board of Education set-up a youth commission to conduct a careful study and make recommendations for this unified program.
  • After months of painstaking work, consultation by the staff with the youth groups and leaders throughout the nation, a nation-wide meeting of the youth and a church-wide poll of all Methodist youth themselves, the decision was made to name the new youth movement At the same time, growing out of this same democratic process, decisions were made as to the motto, emblem, colors, covenant, and benediction of the new Methodist Youth Fellowship.
  • Out of a long creative history, the Methodist Youth Fellowship moves forward to meet the needs of a new generation of youth in every community in America.
  • Epworth League, Philippines (1901- 1941)
    1. 1898- Treaty of Paris/Treaty of Inhumanity (December 10)
    2. 1898- The mock Battle of Manila Bay (May 1)

    -led by Admiral Dewey is with Chaplain George Stull with several other chaplains with different denominations Philippine Context: Filipino-American

  • War 1899-1913
    • 1899 – Private William Grayson fired murderously at a Filipino sentry at Santa Mesa, the beginning of Filipino-American War (February 4)
    • 1899 – Bishop James L. Thoburn arrived (February 28) and organized at Treatro Filipino in Calle Echague on March 2 (5); and call to order the 1st Philippine Islands-Malaya Conference of the Methodist Episcopal Church (MEC); 1st Filipino ordained pastor, Nicolas Zamora (Grandnephew of martyred priest in 1872, Jacinto Zamora) translated preaching and pitch in for sermons in Circuits of Manila, Pandacan and Tondo.
    • 1899 – Remarks from a Methodist United States President to a Methodist clergymen delegation at the White House (November 21) explained how he came to colonized and invaded the Philippines: Pres. William McKinley, said: “…I went down on my knees and prayed the Almighty God for light and guidance more than one night… to do to take them all and to educate the Filipinos, and uplift, civilized and Christianized them, and by God’s grace to do the very best we could by them…
    • 1899 – Massacre of Filipino prisoners in Caloocan under Col. William Stotsenberg of the Montana Volunteers of the United States Army (April)
    • 1901 – Massacre of Filipinos in the island of Samar (a reprisal attacked in Balangiga in September 28) under Gen. Jacob “Howling” “Roaring Hell” Smith of the United States Army E.L. Organized in Manila, January 13, 1901 led by Annie Norton First chapter of E.L. to be organized Knox and St. Paul Methodist Episcopal Churches.
    • 1905 – Establishment of Cristianos Vivos based in Baliuag, Bulacan
    • 1909 – Schism: Iglesia Ebanghelika Metodista En Las Islas Filipinas in Tondo.
    • By 1912 expanded in Northern Luzon.
  • By 1918 1st District Epworth League Conference held in Manila By 1921 1st Christmas Epworth League Institute (C.E.L.I.) held in Sibul Springs, San Miguel, Bulacan; organized by Rev. Joshua F. Cottingham, attended by sixty-two (62) participants from Manila District (Manila, Zambales & Bataan) By 1924 of December, Pangasinan District organizes its
    own C.E.L.I.
  • By October 27-29, 1935 1st Epworth League National Conference held in Cabanatuan, Nueva Ecija, Mr. Servando Cleto was elected President of the League.
  • 1939 – Reunion of Churches: Methodist Episcopal Church (MEC), Methodist Episcopal Church, South (MECS), and Methodist Protestant Church (MPC); The Methodist Church (MC) Jurisdictional Conference began as part of structure. By December 4-6, 1941 the 2nd and last National Conference of Epworth League held in Lingayen, Pangasinan, to set-up Methodist Youth Fellowship was presented and adopted. Japanese adventurist invasion of the Philippines (1942-1945).
  • By November 26-28, 1945 to set-up a Constitution was approved and ratified for the Methodist Youth Fellowship in Paniqui, Tarlac by Bishop Dionisio D. Alejandro.
  • 1946 – Establishment of Philippine Methodist Church (PMC) in San Nicholas, Pangasinan led by Rev. Cipriano Navarro and Rev. Samuel Stagg and by January 2-5, 1952 the first National Conference of Methodist Youth Fellowship held in Guimba, Nueva Ecija, led by Rev. F.V.Cabotaje was then the executive secretary of the Central Conference Board of Education and La Verne Mercado was elected President.
  • 1968 – The Union: The Methodist Church (MC) and The Evangelical United Brethren (EUB), into United Methodist Church (UMC); establishment of committee on structure for Autonomy in the United States was adopted Continuing youth ministry.
  • Ecumenical involvement: La Verne Mercado pioneered establishing the Ecumenical Youth Movement in the 1960’s.
  • Martial Law years: Bishop La Verne Mercado arrested; Romeo Crismo abducted.
  • NUMYFP: made a position paper condemning the arrest and abduction, as well as the declaration of Martial Law 1974- Bishops (Granadosin and Valencia) of the United Methodist Church visited Malacañang in support (?) of Martial rule Many UMYF members in the University campuses in Metro Manila are involved in a progressive youth organization called “Kabataan Makabayan” an ecumenical expression during their time.
  • The campus ministry: Student Christian Movement organized.
  • The clandestine: Christians for National Liberation founded Pananaw was established in 1980 Tanglaw was established in 1981.
  • Baguio Youth Formation (BYF) formed from 1981-1989; the 13 Hakbang Sa Pananampalataya was implemented Involvement at EDSA People Power Uprising The National UMYF Philippines seeking support of organization’s statement of EDSA in 1986. The National UMYF Philippines position to a Nuclear-Free Philippines in 1986.
  • The UMYF Constitution of 1982.
  • The UMYF Constitution of 1988.
  • The UMYF founding member of The Kalipunan ng Kristianong Kabataan sa Pilipinas in 1990. The birth and conceptualization of Asian Methodist Heritage network in 1991 under the leadership of National UMYF- Philippines and National MYF-Korea.
  • The Asian Methodist Youth Seminar 1992, The Asian Methodist Youth Conference 1998, The Asian Methodist Youth Network 2004.
  • The Dark years of Transparency and Accountability of 1993 and 1998.
  • The UMYF Constitution of 1998.

 

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

The Official Website of the United Methodist Youth Fellowship in the Philippines